The pictures are in of tonight's partial lunar eclipse.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth, sun, and moon are almost exactly in line and the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the sun.

Dudley News:

Eclipse over Kingstone by Linda Thomas

The moon is full, moves into the shadow of the Earth and dims dramatically but usually remains visible, lit by sunlight that passes through the Earth's atmosphere.

The eclipse could be seen in the UK until around 1.17am.

Dudley News:

Eclipse by Chris Lyons

According to the Royal Astronomical Society, mid-eclipse took place at 10.30pm, when about 60 per cent of the visible surface of the moon was covered by the umbra – which can sometimes appear red in colour to people observing from the ground due to a more powerful atmospheric scattering of blue light hitting the surface.

Dudley News:

Eclipse over Leominster by Waldemar Bejer‎

Before the eclipse, Dr Morgan Hollis from the Royal Astronomical Society advised: "Unlike a solar eclipse it's entirely safe to watch a lunar eclipse with the naked eye, so this one is fine, you don't need any special equipment and it should be fairly warm as well, given temperatures recently, it should be good if the weather is clear and the conditions are clear."

Dudley News:

Eclipse over Kington by Kay Dickerson

The event also took place over much of Asia, Africa, eastern parts of South America, and the western parts of Australia.

Dudley News:

Eclipse over Leominster by Karl Ryan

Dudley News:

Eclipse by Chris Bridges

Dudley News:

Eclipse over Ross-on-Wye by Tom Keddie

Dudley News:

Eclipse by Karen Friedman www.karenfriedman.co.uk

Dudley News:

Eclipse by Belinda Olsen

Dudley News:

Eclipse by Ella Mentry